• Good range-of-motion is part of good physical fitness
    FAQs,  Fitness tips

    Physical fitness explained in simple terms

    Ever wonder exactly what we mean when we say “fitness”? Let’s take a moment to look at physical fitness the term most often used when considering exercise and physical activity. Physical fitness Physical fitness is a person’s ability to perform activities while taking into account several body systems working together. Being more “fit” allows you to do things with less effort. 11 parts – 6 health-related, 5 skill-related Physical fitness can be broken down into two broad categories. Health and skills. The health-related parts of physical fitness include: cardiorespiratory endurance (the fitness of your heart and lungs) muscular strength (the fitness of your muscles in regards to strength) muscular endurance…

  • The illness of being sedentary
    Exercise,  Fitness tips

    Seniors: The illness of being sedentary

    A senior who does not engage in regular resistance training experiences rapid losses in muscle quality, mass, and function. These losses are directly tied with chronic illness and problems of movement and balance. The losses of muscle mass are associated with a decrease in the production of myokines which have endocrine like effects on body organs and may play a role in exercise related protection against chronic illness (Jacobs, 2018; Tipton, 2009). Simultaneously, chronic disease in of itself creates a viscous cycle for the fitness of individuals. Minus the factors of normal aging, diseases such as heart failure, diabetes, obstructive lung disease, liver failure, cancer, and AIDS may all lead…

  • Can weight training help with weight loss?
    Exercise,  Fitness tips

    Can weight training help with weight loss?

    Exercise is an important part of any weight management paradigm. Aerobic exercise should be prescribed for every person attempting to lose weight and a resistance training program used to support metabolism. Weight loss via dietary restriction alone negatively impacts metabolism. Hypometabolism increases with caloric deficient diets beyond what would be expected from the loss of fat free mass (FFM). This state of hypometabolism causes energy conservation which makes dietary restriction less efficient over time. In a calorie reduced diet, when an individual reaches about 10% weight loss, total energy expenditure (TEE) decreases beyond what could be expected due to deceases in FFM. This reflects the body becoming increasingly energy conserving…